The Missing Review of Jane Caro’s ‘Oz Book of #Atheism’ Entry…

Andrei Rublev's Trinity, representing the Fath...
Andrei Rublev’s Trinity, representing the Father, Son and Holy Spirit in a similar manner. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Once upon a time, I was reviewing the individual entries in the Australian Book of Atheism.  After I discovered that the essays were just making me grumpy due to the poor reasoning, wild assertions, and general awfulness of the tone, I gave up writing all these down.  But I still have my notes.  Oh, yes.  I still have my notes…

The latest in Australia’s pop-religious discussion is For God’s Sake — a ‘debate in book form’.  The book has four authors, one of whom wrote an entry in The Australian Book of Atheism, Jane Caro.  I’m no stranger to criticising Caro.  One of my biggest complaints is her presentation as an academic expert in the public education debate.

My criticism of her article in The Australian Book of Atheism, however, was so scathing that I refrained from uploading it to this blog.  As was fairly evident, I wasn’t the intended audience for the book in general.  Despite being an atheist and interested in the history of atheism, this was a book for the happy-clapper atheist.  The sort of atheist who happily repeats everything they’ve heard that conforms with their prejudices, biases, and intuitions.  The sort of atheist who describes religion as the source of all social evils in the world in one breath, then ignorantly attacks Islam and its adherents in the second.

But reading Caro’s contribution to For God’s Sake made me remember the horribleness of her entry in The Australian Book of Atheism.  It seems obvious that terrible things happen when intelligent people say nothing.

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